Nokia gaze tracking eyewear website

 

Go ahead, wake up your smartphone. No, don’t touch it! Just look at it. Wait for a second…and…yes! It recognizes you. You don’t even need to key in a pass code. Your phone identifies the unique way your eyes flicker . See? What app do you want to open? News? Okay, stare at the icon. Want to scroll through an article? Look down. Pause a video? Look away.


The day when eye tracking becomes a common feature in mobile gadgets may not be far off. The technology got a lot of buzz this March when Samsung demonstrated finger-free scrolling and video control on its flagship phone, the Galaxy S4, during the product’s launch in New York City. The same week, LG Electronics announced it would include similar capabilities in its newest smartphone, the Optimus G Pro.


But while the South Korean giants may be trailblazers in bringing gaze-based interfacing to the mobile market, analysts and researchers say their products only scratch the surface of what’s possible. The Galaxy S4, for instance, knows when to start or stop a video simply by discerning the presence of a user’s face through its front-facing camera. And it scrolls text by sensing the tilts of the user’s wrist. 


Nokia gaze tracking eyewear website

3. sgodsell (Posts: 4221; Member since: 16 Mar 2013) Not to belittle this technology, but judging from this eye gaze tracking . It looks like the sensors have to be ...

In early development, Starbreeze and Tobii today announced their collaboration to integrate Tobii’s revolutionary eye tracking into the StarVR HMD.

Hi Roman Hosek, When will you post these tutorials ?. I really need a android eye tracking tutorial for my final year project. I searched every where but couldn’t ...

Go ahead, wake up your smartphone. No, don’t touch it! Just look at it. Wait for a second…and…yes! It recognizes you. You don’t even need to key in a pass code. Your phone identifies the unique way your eyes flicker . See? What app do you want to open? News? Okay, stare at the icon. Want to scroll through an article? Look down. Pause a video? Look away.


The day when eye tracking becomes a common feature in mobile gadgets may not be far off. The technology got a lot of buzz this March when Samsung demonstrated finger-free scrolling and video control on its flagship phone, the Galaxy S4, during the product’s launch in New York City. The same week, LG Electronics announced it would include similar capabilities in its newest smartphone, the Optimus G Pro.


But while the South Korean giants may be trailblazers in bringing gaze-based interfacing to the mobile market, analysts and researchers say their products only scratch the surface of what’s possible. The Galaxy S4, for instance, knows when to start or stop a video simply by discerning the presence of a user’s face through its front-facing camera. And it scrolls text by sensing the tilts of the user’s wrist.