Spy software for nikon d40

 

The new Samyang 135mm f/2.0 ED UMC lens is now officially announced. The Nikon version comes with an AE chip for focus confirmation and use of Auto/P/A/S/M

Often compared with Franz Liszt, Mason & Hamlin Artist Jarrod Radnich has captured the top position on YouTube for solo piano performance, ranked #1 for classical ...

2. Nikon 8397 ACULON. The Nikon 8397 ACULON Laser Rangefinder features a sleek and compact design, which makes it one of the most simple and portable rangefinders …

Spy software for nikon d40


The new Samyang 135mm f/2.0 ED UMC lens is now officially announced . The Nikon version comes with an AE chip for focus confirmation and use of Auto/P/A/S/M shooting modes. B&H is currently taking pre-orders for $549  (the Nikon 135mm f/2 lens is $1,299 ). There is also a cinema version of this lens priced at $599 (135mm T2.2 VDSLR ED UMC). Adorama is also taking pre-orders .

Update : the first  Samyang 135mm f/2.0 ED UMC lens review  with sample images and comparison with other lenses is already out (see the  Google translation ). Here are few sample photos taken from the review (only the first photo is taken with a Nikon camera, the rest were taken with Canon, click for larger version):

Bokeh is going to be great since a 135mm f2 is quite easy to be designed. Plus it has 9 rounded aperture blades and the MTF chart indicates that it is smooth.

The new Samyang 135mm f/2.0 ED UMC lens is now officially announced. The Nikon version comes with an AE chip for focus confirmation and use of Auto/P/A/S/M

Often compared with Franz Liszt, Mason & Hamlin Artist Jarrod Radnich has captured the top position on YouTube for solo piano performance, ranked #1 for classical ...

2. Nikon 8397 ACULON. The Nikon 8397 ACULON Laser Rangefinder features a sleek and compact design, which makes it one of the most simple and portable rangefinders …

In addition to the above, lenses with mechanical levers are hard to adapt with other systems via third party adapters. If you have been wondering why adapters for Nikon lenses are hard to use and do not give complete and precise aperture control, now you know why – other manufacturers simply would not have the same lever control mechanism in their camera bodies. An adapter capable of mechanically moving a lever would require a motor with an electronic chip, which would make the solution quite cost-prohibitive.

In contrast, lenses that feature electromagnetic diaphragms do not have any mechanical levers – changes in aperture are communicated electronically by the camera through lens contacts. Such method of aperture control is much more preferred, because lenses can set their apertures consistently and accurately, with no shot-to-shot variation.

Because of the above, using a mechanical lever to change aperture is prone to inconsistency in exposure and potential mechanical issues both in camera and in lenses. Canon realized this and fully moved to electronic aperture control on both EF and EF-S mounts a while ago, and Nikon has only recently started updating its lenses to “E” type lenses with electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism. Unfortunately, such lenses have been limited to mostly super telephoto and higher-end zoom lenses, so despite the obvious disadvantages, Nikon has still been releasing many modern “G” type lenses with mechanical levers.