Mobile spy cnet 404

 

Computer security experts are often surprised at which stories get picked up by the mainstream media. Sometimes it makes no sense. Why this particular data breach, vulnerability, or worm and not others? Sometimes it's obvious. In the case of Stuxnet, there's a great story.

As the story goes, the Stuxnet worm was designed and released by a government--the U.S. and Israel are the most common suspects--specifically to attack the Bushehr nuclear power plant in Iran. How could anyone not report that? It combines computer attacks, nuclear power, spy agencies and a country that's a pariah to much of the world. The only problem with the story is that it's almost entirely speculation.

Here's what we do know : Stuxnet is an Internet worm that infects Windows computers. It primarily spreads via USB sticks, which allows it to get into computers and networks not normally connected to the Internet. Once inside a network, it uses a variety of mechanisms to propagate to other machines within that network and gain privilege once it has infected those machines. These mechanisms include both known and patched vulnerabilities, and four "zero-day exploits": vulnerabilities that were unknown and unpatched when the worm was released. (All the infection vulnerabilities have since been patched.)

Mobile spy cnet 404

“Maybe you think comics are pictures of people walking and talking and beating each other up. Well, comics are art, which means... new ideas, new innovations.” A rarely seen 1978 documentary about the comics business has shown up online for the very first time, and it’s must-watch material for folks who want to see some of comics’ most important talents in their prime.

A rare copy of “The World of Comic Books”—owned by Word Balloon podcast/host John Siuntres — showed at Comic-Con International four years ago but, as far as I can tell, it’s never been available online before. I came across it via the Twitter timeline of author Sean Howe, who wrote the seminal Marvel Comics: The Untold Story . First screened on Canadian television 39 years ago, “The World of Comic Books” offers a peek at the internal processes of DC and Marvel editorial at a time when the medium was trying to be taken seriously.

Narrated by Jonathan Winters, the film apes the bombastic style that was in vogue in superhero comics at the time, complete with groan-inducing sound effects. But, despite that, it captures a rare glimpse of the people who made classic comics hashing out ideas with each other. One sequence shows Denny O’Neil, Neal Adams and Julie Schwartz as the creators talked about the famous cover of Superman vs. Muhammad Ali with the late editorial legend.

Computer security experts are often surprised at which stories get picked up by the mainstream media. Sometimes it makes no sense. Why this particular data breach, vulnerability, or worm and not others? Sometimes it's obvious. In the case of Stuxnet, there's a great story.

As the story goes, the Stuxnet worm was designed and released by a government--the U.S. and Israel are the most common suspects--specifically to attack the Bushehr nuclear power plant in Iran. How could anyone not report that? It combines computer attacks, nuclear power, spy agencies and a country that's a pariah to much of the world. The only problem with the story is that it's almost entirely speculation.

Here's what we do know : Stuxnet is an Internet worm that infects Windows computers. It primarily spreads via USB sticks, which allows it to get into computers and networks not normally connected to the Internet. Once inside a network, it uses a variety of mechanisms to propagate to other machines within that network and gain privilege once it has infected those machines. These mechanisms include both known and patched vulnerabilities, and four "zero-day exploits": vulnerabilities that were unknown and unpatched when the worm was released. (All the infection vulnerabilities have since been patched.)

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