Detractor cell phone spying

 

Detractor cell phone spying

As previously described, forage quality reflects the ability of a given forage to meet the nutrient needs of the consuming animal. Forage fiber content is the primary detractor to high intake and nutrient availability. Relative to assessing forage quality, fiber tests are our single best method, though additional tests for protein and moisture can help to further characterize the forage. The following are brief descriptions of forage analysis tests and their interpretation relative to forage quality.

Another measure of fiber is acid detergent fiber (ADF) , a subset of NDF. Acid detergent fiber contains the poorly digestible cell wall components, namely, cellulose, lignin, and other very resistant substances. Due to its nature, ADF is often used to predict energy content of feeds. Like NDF, ADF is a good indicator of feed quality; higher values within a feed suggest lower-quality feed. A goal would be to have < 35% ADF in either legume or grass forages. Refer back to table 1 shown in the first column (page 33 in June 2006 issue) for the changes in NDF and ADF with forage maturity.

Feed protein content is often considered a good determinant of quality. In actuality protein cannot be directly measured, it is estimated from feed sample nitrogen (N) content. On average all biological proteins contain 16% N, therefore protein content is estimated by multiplying N% by 6.25 (6.25 = 1 ) 0.16). Thus, crude protein does not differentiate between N in feed samples coming from true protein or other nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) compounds, nor does it differentiate between available and unavailable protein.