Mobile spyaxe

 

This is a summary of a popular posting to Mark's Sysinternals Blog (http://www.sysinternals.com/blog). You can read the entire blog post at http://www.sysinternals.com/blog/2006/01/antispyware-conspiracy.html.

Since the release of the first antivirus products, many people have believed in a conspiracy theory that has antivirus companies generating their own market by paying virus writers to develop and release viruses. I don't subscribe to that theory, and I trust the major security vendors, but recent trends show that a fuzzy line exists between second-tier antispyware vendors and the malware their products clean.

The most innocuous of malware-like anti-malware behaviors is to advertise with Web site banners and pop-ups that mislead users into thinking that they have a malware problem. Most of the ads look like Windows error messages, complete with Yes and No buttons, and clicking anywhere on the image, even the No button, results in the browser following the underlying link to the target page. I recently ran across an example of this behavior when a click on an ad image took me to a page at http://www.myspwarecleaner.com. The page looks like a Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) error message and guides visitors to download and install an antispyware utility called Spyware Cleaner.

Mobile spyaxe

This web site uses cookies to improve your experience. By viewing our content, you are accepting the use of cookies. To find out more and change your cookie settings, please view our cookie policy .

Microsoft's Windows 10 Mobile test build 10586.71 is a preview of a cumulative update that includes a bunch of bug fixes.

Microsoft changes its IE Flash policies, there are ructions in HTML5, and Adobe is readying a new release of its Flash development tools. Is it time for the return of the plug-in?

This is a summary of a popular posting to Mark's Sysinternals Blog (http://www.sysinternals.com/blog). You can read the entire blog post at http://www.sysinternals.com/blog/2006/01/antispyware-conspiracy.html.

Since the release of the first antivirus products, many people have believed in a conspiracy theory that has antivirus companies generating their own market by paying virus writers to develop and release viruses. I don't subscribe to that theory, and I trust the major security vendors, but recent trends show that a fuzzy line exists between second-tier antispyware vendors and the malware their products clean.

The most innocuous of malware-like anti-malware behaviors is to advertise with Web site banners and pop-ups that mislead users into thinking that they have a malware problem. Most of the ads look like Windows error messages, complete with Yes and No buttons, and clicking anywhere on the image, even the No button, results in the browser following the underlying link to the target page. I recently ran across an example of this behavior when a click on an ad image took me to a page at http://www.myspwarecleaner.com. The page looks like a Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) error message and guides visitors to download and install an antispyware utility called Spyware Cleaner.

Hi I've got this crap program on my computer called spyaxe 3.0. I've googled it and its actually a bad program and very annoying, not installed because of me but it just installed itself.

I've tried a couple of methods to get rid of it, including from www.thex.com/rd/2005/11/26/firefox-spyaxe and another from
tools.mcafeehelp.com/doc...95886&support=ts

But both didn't work.

Anyone had experience with this program and getting rid of it. Is there an easier way or just a program that will do it?

Cheers,
Lee

rid of it. Is there an easier way or just a program that will do it?

This should help you.

knights.orgfree.com/spyaxe_removal.htm

Thanks for the replies. I'm running McAfee free scan on the net now and it has found spyaxe but the scan hasn't finished yet, so will see if I can remove it. Hmm its finished but there doesn't seem to be a way to remove using this freescan, what a waste of time!

If you’ve deleted a critical file, it may seem at first that it’s gone forever. If you act quickly, though, you may be able to recover that file and return it to its rightful place on your hard drive. Recover deleted files from your computer by restoring them from the Recycle Bin (Windows) or Trash (Mac); when that isn't an option, you can also use recovery software to restore deleted files for Windows, Mac, and Linux computers.